/ Impfservice 9 Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

 

What is measles?

Measles

Measles is a severe viral infection that can have grave consequences for both babies and children and for young people and adults. The symptoms of the infection include high fever, coughing and a rash characterised by small red spots. Often, measles is accompanied by middle ear infection or pneumonia. About 1 in 1,000 infected persons develops a life-threatening inflammation of the brain that can cause permanent impairments. The immune system of the body is weakened by measles to such an extent that there remains an increased risk of contracting other infectious diseases over several years.

There exists no treatment for measles itself; only the symptoms can be relieved. Prophylactic vaccination is very effective in preventing infection.

Measles is passed on via droplet infection, primarily by speaking, coughing and sneezing. This is a highly contagious disease; infected persons are contagious already 4 days before the first symptoms appear. On an average, it takes 8 to 12 days after infection for the first symptoms to appear. A two-dose vaccination confers excellent and almost lifelong protection against an infection with measles.


What is mumps?

Mumps is a severe viral infection that often leads to inflammation of the parotid gland (parotitis) but also to inflammation of the cerebral membrane, the pancreas and reproductive glands (gonads). In boys and adult men, mumps can cause inflammation of the testicles, with subsequent infertility.

There exists no treatment for mumps itself; only the symptoms can be relieved.

Mumps is passed on via droplet infection, primarily by speaking, coughing and sneezing. This is a highly contagious disease and particularly dangerous for adults. On an average, it takes 18 days after infection for the first symptoms to appear.


What is rubella?

Rubella is a viral infection that in most cases takes a relatively harmless course. However, rubella is very dangerous during pregnancy: an infection with rubella during pregnancy can cause severe malformations of the eyes, brain and heart of the unborn baby or trigger a miscarriage.

There exists no treatment for rubella itself; only the symptoms can be relieved.

Rubella is passed on via droplet infection, primarily by speaking, coughing and sneezing. After infection, it takes 14 to 21 days for the first symptoms to appear.


Vaccination advice for children, young people and adults

The Austrian Vaccination Plan recommends the combined vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella starting after the 9th month of life. In any case, children should be vaccinated before they are admitted to a childcare facility, such as a crèche, kindergarten, etc.

The measles-mumps-rubella vaccination administered at public vaccination centres and under the Vienna Vaccination Concept is free of charge for all age groups!


Vaccination schedule

2 vaccinations with a minimum interval of 4 weeks in between

Even if the first MMR vaccination was given many years ago, the protection can be completed any time by taking the second vaccination.

Booster vaccinations are not required.

First vaccination: recommended after the 9th month of life
Second vaccination: 4 weeks after the first vaccination at the earliest; if the first vaccination was given before the 1st birthday, an interval of 3 months before the second vaccination is recommended.

Vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella during pregnancy is not allowed!


Information and consultancy:

You have never been vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella? You are unsure whether or not you are protected? Do you have trouble finding your Certificate of Vaccination?