/ Impfservice 9 Young people and adults

Vaccination Plan

 

The Austrian Vaccination Plan recommends free-of-charge vaccinations and vaccinations subject to payment of a fee.

Free-of-charge vaccinations for young people from 15 years of age and adults

 

  • Vaccination with 1 vaccine against 3 diseases (combined vaccine):
    measles-mumps-rubella, catch-up vaccination for persons who have not yet been vaccinated twice
  • vaccination against polio (poliomyelitis) as single vaccination – free of charge before the 21st birthday (only at the vaccination centres operated by the Public Health Services of the City of Vienna – “Impfservice Town Town”)

Where can I get the measles-mumps-rubella vaccination?

 

Vaccinations subject to payment of a fee for young people from 15 years of age and adults

 

 

  • Vaccination against TBE (tick-borne encephalitis), starting any time; following the 4 initial vaccinations, a booster is required every 5 years, then every 3 years for persons over the age of 60 years.
  • Vaccination against influenza, every year roughly from October
  • Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), from the 21st birthday at cost price
  • Vaccination against varicella (chickenpox) for persons who have not yet been vaccinated twice and have not had varicella
  • Vaccination against hepatitis B as potential catch-up vaccination; primarily recommended in case of work-related or personal risk
  • Vaccination against meningococcal disease A, C, W, Y and B as potential catch-up vaccination (primarily for young people and persons at higher risk)

 

Where can I get these vaccinations?

Advice for special circumstances and persons over 50 years of age

 

Women planning a pregnancy

 

While the general advice for adults applies here as well, please also give special consideration to the following aspects:

  • Prior to getting pregnant, please check whether you have had 2 vaccinations against measles, mumps and rubella.
    An infection with rubella during pregnancy can severely harm your baby, causing malformations of the eyes, brain and heart. Vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella during pregnancy is not allowed.
  • Please also check whether you have had 2 vaccinations against varicella (chickenpox). You are only protected if you were vaccinated or have definitely had varicella (chickenpox). Varicella, too, can cause malformations in your baby. If you are not sure, you can find out your level of protection with a blood test. Vaccination against varicella during pregnancy is not allowed.
  • Influenza can take a particularly severe course during pregnancy. Make sure to get vaccinated against influenza every year.

 

 

Pregnant women

 

  • The Austrian Vaccination Plan recommends a booster vaccination against whooping cough (pertussis) between the 27th and 36th week of pregnancy. In this way, your baby will receive antibodies for the first months of life via the umbilical cord. By getting vaccinated, you protect your child against a severe case of whooping cough before they are able to receive the vaccination.
  • If you have not been vaccinated against influenza, you can get the influenza vaccination also during pregnancy. This is best done starting from the 12th week of pregnancy – ask your medical specialist.

 

 

Persons over 50 years of age

 

  • The Austrian Vaccination Plan recommends vaccination against herpes zoster (shingles).
  • If you are a smoker, have high blood pressure or suffer from a vascular disorder or recurrent bronchitis, ask your doctor about getting vaccinated against pneumococcal disease.

 

 

Persons over 60 years of age

 

  • For persons over 60 years of age, the Austrian Vaccination Plan recommends vaccination against pneumococcal disease. The first vaccination is given using a vaccine against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria; the second vaccination is given 1 year later with a vaccine against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria, followed by a booster vaccination 6 years after the second vaccination.
  • Shorter intervals between booster vaccinations
    – against diphtheria, whooping cough (pertussis), tetanus and polio (poliomyelitis): every 5 years
    – against TBE (tick-borne encephalitis): every 3 years
  • The annual vaccination against influenza (flu) is particularly important for this age group.
  • You might also catch up on the vaccination against herpes zoster (shingles) if you have not yet had it (see persons over 50 years of age).

 

 

Persons employed in certain fields of work

 

The Austrian Vaccination Plan recommends additional vaccinations for persons employed

  • in certain fields of work, and specifically for workers in the healthcare sector
  • workers with a high number of interpersonal contacts
  • workers in contact with animals, food
  • workers in contact with waste, dirt and similar

Information and consultancy

 

Getting vaccinated – when, where, what?
We are happy to advise you on which vaccinations are the right ones for you!

 

Vaccination calendar for young people and adults